How to Remove Rust Stains From Toilet Bowl

Like other stains on the toilet bowl, rust can occur from the mineral deposits that are found especially in hard water with high iron content. It can also occur from rusty toilet components that leak into the back of the bowl and other rust from metal components in the tank. Take note that this type of stain can be quite difficult to remove and even impossible to get rid of especially when it is a recurring and chronic problem in your bathroom that has already etched itself into the porcelain.

Like other stains on the toilet bowl, rust can occur from the mineral deposits that are found especially in hard water with high iron content. It can also occur from rusty toilet components that leak into the back of the bowl and other rust from metal components in the tank. Take note that this type of stain can be quite difficult to remove and even impossible to get rid of especially when it is a recurring and chronic problem in your bathroom that has already etched itself into the porcelain.

Now, do not falter as most stains are not that bad, and you can still remove them with the proper knowledge of what solutions to use. Let us take a look at some options that are available to you in removing rust stains from your toilet bowl.

Shaw’s Pads

Basically, this is a toilet ring remover that is considered as one of the simplest, most interesting yet effective product for removing stains. With it, you do not need to use chemicals. It is safe for any septic system and will work on the old principle of elbow grease. This set of special pads has a short handle, where you just have to wet the pads, use them with short vigorous strokes and see the scale and stain coming free from your toilet.

Pumice Stick

This scouring stick works well in removing rust stains from you porcelain toilet. Though this is not recommended for fiberglass toilets, these units are rarely used. To use it, you simply wet the bar and rub it back and forth on the stained area of your toilet. While doing so, you would notice a pumice paste developing that will help you in cleaning and polishing the bowl’s surface. To finish things up, you just have to rinse it clean.

Scouring Cleansers

Instead of using some regular household food stain cleansers that contain chlorine bleach, you should go for a scouring cleanser, as the former can hardly work on rust stains. This product has what it takes to get rid of rust and mineral deposits, not to mention that this powdered cleanser, which also comes in liquid form, is environmentally friendly. It works so well thanks to its composition, where it uses oxalic acid and a potent combination of abrasives that are composed of pumice and very fine ground quartz. But though such acid is a naturally occurring, it is considered as a poison, so it might not do well if you have a septic system, as it is said by experts that killing bacteria in your septic is not a good idea.

To use this product, you just have to sprinkle or squirt it on the stained area of your toilet bowl, and then brush it up with a plastic pad or a toilet cleaning brush. Then, add more water to the bowl to allow the stained areas to be covered by the solution. After it has set for at least an hour or so, clean the bowl with the brush and flush the toilet clean.

Chemical Cleaners

These products have been around for decades and have been doing a good job in getting rid of rust stains on your toilet bowl without a lot of elbow grease. Basically, you just have to spray them on, let them set for several minutes and then rinse away the stain. However these products are about 20% hydrochloric acid, so use them with caution. They are not even recommended for use if you have a septic system.

Borax Powder

Take note that borax is different from boric acid in a way that it is a natural mineral that is found in toothpastes and hand soaps, coming with the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) name of sodium tetraborate decahydrate. When used in large amounts, it can be as harmful as the ordinary table salt or baking soda. But to be sure, your toilet is safe from borax. If no discoloration happens when testing it, you may go on with your task of cleaning your toilet with it. Make sure you keep it in a place that is not accessible to children and pets.

Vinegar

For mild rust build-ups, white vinegar can be a great replacement for toilet bowl cleaning products. Aside from being safe and affordable, it is readily available in your kitchen and is a natural disinfectant and deodorizer.

Baking Soda

Another safe chemical to use for getting rid of rust stain on your toilet bowl is the baking soda or sodium bicarbonate. You see, many homeowners prefer to use this, combined with vinegar, in cleaning their toilets. This alkaline, crystalline powder works thanks to its array of cleaning properties that can soften hard water and eliminate stains from alcohol, oil and grease.

How Often Should You Clean Your Toilet Bowl

You are using your toilet every day for several times, but you have most likely overlooked it when it comes to cleaning, only for you to notice that the dirt and stains on it are already too obvious to ignore. If this is really your case, things would be difficult for you to remove such a problem. Remember that rust stains are not easy to remove, so you might want to do some deep cleaning every week, which will make the task a breeze. However, this does not mean that it is okay for you not to clean your toilet every day. Take note that everyday cleaning allows you to avoid build-up of mineral deposits. In just a few minutes, rub the interior of your toilet bowl with water.

Important Notes

Before you start cleaning, it is important to allow enough ventilation by opening your bathroom door and windows. Do not forget to wear rubber gloves to protect you against germs and other substances that can harm your health. If possible, also wear some protective eyewear.

You should also tell your family not to use the bathroom if you are cleaning your toilet. See to it that you have cleaned all items you used for the task before keeping them in storage.

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